BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY IN JULY AT CARLINGFORD LOUGH

Carlingford lough
In our last post, we shared our walk around the coastal town of Carlingford. However, the main purpose of our visit was to do some bird photography in July at Carlingford lough. The shoreline of the lough near to Carlingford village is designated as both a Special Area of Conservation under the EU Habitats Directive and an EU Special Protection Area that safeguards and maintains the habitats of migratory birds. It is part of the Natura 2000 network of protected areas and listed under the Ramsar Wetlands of International Importance.

For me this puts Carlingford on a par with my beloved Manawatu Estuary back home in New Zealand.

Street Photography in Carlingford Village

 

While doing some research on migratory birds in Ireland, Rosie and I learned that Carlingford Lough is an area of vital importance to wading birds. Each year large numbers of migrating waders from the arctic regions overwinter on the lough with parts of the lough being designated as special protection areas. It was that information that initially drew our curiosity towards the village of Carlingford in Ireland.

Carlingford Lough shore with Rostrevor Mountains in N Ireland ‘smoking’ in the background

Being serious bird photographers we knew that in order for us to successfully photograph the wintering birds of Carlingford Lough, it would require many visits over the winter into early spring. We had heaps of planning and information gathering ahead of us and still do at the time of writing this post.

While researching the lough, images of the colourful town houses kept popping up on our computer screens… intriguing us. So it was decided that for our first big adventure down south, we would do some street photography in Carlingford village. Then we would explore the lough and its surrounds on later visits.

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The colour of spring part 1

Having experienced my first spring here in Northern Ireland with Rosie, I felt the urge to share some of what we have been photographing over this period.

Late March saw the first of the spring flowers appearing from their hibernation.

Back home in New Zealand, daffodil and crocus are the first flowers to erupt from the earth, bringing colour to an otherwise muted tapestry of grey, brown and green.
It seems that this is also the case in Northern Ireland.

Derrymore House, the yellow cottage

Derrymore house

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The First Day of Spring

This is the first post for my new series What has Boney Whitefoot been up to lately?
I will try and post in my blog more regularly and hopefully those that read my posts will continue to enjoy reading about our photographic adventures in Northern Ireland.

Last Wednesday morning, the first official day of spring, Rosie and I woke to a wonderfully fine day and decided to explore a stretch of river in our local area in County Armagh.
We had not visited this spot before, but we had studied the area online and we anticipated an exciting day ahead of us.
We packed our lunch, leapt into the car, zoomed off heading north and 20minutes later we arrived at our destination.

I have started a new blog with Rosie so hop on over to out new blog and sign up to follow our latest adventures here and to read the rest of this post here.

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Christmas trip for long tails 2020 Part 2: koekoeā paradise

System reboot and the apology

Last year I was to start the year off with blog posts containing images of birds, stories of adventures and images of New Zealand landscapes.
After my first post of our Christmas trip and promises of more to come, my readers ended up with nothing from me for an entire year.
Once again I failed to follow up with part two of our annual  Chrissie adventure.
I apologise for that but please let me explain. Continue reading